Indications

Prolia® is a prescription medicine used to treat osteoporosis in women after menopause who are at high risk for fracture or cannot use another osteoporosis medicine or other osteoporosis medicines did not work well.

Prolia® is a prescription medicine used to increase bone mass in men with osteoporosis who are at high risk for fracture.

Prolia® is a prescription medicine used to treat osteoporosis in men and women who will be taking corticosteroid medicines (such as prednisone) for at least six months and are at high risk for fracture.

Prolia® is a prescription medicine used to treat bone loss in men who are at high risk for fracture receiving certain treatments for prostate cancer that has not spread to other parts of the body.

Prolia® is a prescription medicine used to treat bone loss in women who are at high risk for fracture receiving certain treatments for breast cancer that has not spread to other parts of the body.

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Prolia® is an injection administered by a healthcare professional and is covered by bothMedicare Part B and Medicare Part D

What you pay will depend on your Medicare plan and whether your doctor orders Prolia® from a distributor (medical benefit) or gets it from a pharmacy (pharmacy benefit).

Ask your doctor how you can get Prolia®

Medicare Part B (Medical Benefit)

Nearly 77% of Medicare Part B Prolia® patients have supplemental insurance and pay $0§ out-of-pocket every six months

The remaining 23% of Medicare Part B Prolia® patients pay up to $212.99§,** out-of-pocket every six months depending on the patient's selected Part B plan

Patients pay for Prolia® twice per year

These data do not include out-of-pocket costs related to office visits or administration of Prolia®

Medicare Part D (Pharmacy Benefit)

63% of all Medicare Part D patients pay less than $50§,** out-of-pocket every six months

36% of all Medicare Part D patients pay $50.02-$667.29§,** out-of-pocket every six months††

Your out-of-pocket costs can vary throughout the year depending on which phase‡‡ of the Part D benefit you are currently in

If you are eligible for the Extra Help§§ program, you pay as little as $3.70 out-of-pocket every six months

Patients pay for Prolia® twice per year

These data do not include out-of-pocket costs related to office visits or administration of Prolia®

Supplemental insurance, also known as secondary insurance or Medigap, helps cover the remaining 20% of therapies that are provided through Medicare Part B. Medicare patients with supplemental coverage may require additional monthly premium. Individual out-of-pocket costs will vary.
§This data is based on Medicare claims between 10/2017 - 06/2018 and only applies to your cost for Prolia®.
**Patients on high deductible plans may pay more out-of-pocket for Prolia®.
††The remaining 1% will pay more out-of-pocket.
‡‡Medicare Part D drug coverage is divided into four phases, each with a different cost sharing amount. Those phases are 1) Deductible, 2) Initial coverage, 3) Coverage gap, 4) Catastrophic.
§§ Additional assistance with Medicare Prescription Drug Plan Costs from the Social Security Administration (SSA) https://www.ssa.gov/benefits/medicare/prescriptionhelp. Accessed on March 22, 2019.

Pay $25 or less with the Prolia® Co-pay Program***

Amgen offers the Prolia® Co-pay Program to eligible people who have commercial insurance. Read below to learn more about your options.

Prolia® Co-pay Program

(for eligible*** commercially insured patients)

  • Pay $25 or less for 1 shot of Prolia® up to the program maximum of $1,500 per calendar year***
  • Reduce out-of-pocket (OOP) costs under the medical or pharmacy benefit
  • Apply savings to deductible, co-insurance, and/or co-pay for Prolia®†††
  • No income eligibility requirement
Find out more about the Prolia® Co-pay Program

***See eligibility and limits.

For more information about this program and eligibility requirements, call 844-369-9962 or visit proliasupport.com.

†††This program does not provide support for any physician-related services associated with administration of Prolia®.

The Prolia® Co-pay Program Prepaid MasterCard® is issued by Comerica Bank pursuant to license by MasterCard International Incorporated. No cash or ATM access. MasterCard is a registered trademark of MasterCard International Incorporated. This card can be used only to cover co-payment for eligible prescriptions covered under the program at participating merchant locations where Debit MasterCard is accepted.

Safety

Amgen Safety Net Foundation (ASNF) is an independent, nonprofit patient assistance program that provides Prolia® at no cost to qualifying patients who have a financial need and who are uninsured or have insurance that excludes Prolia®.

Hear from real people taking Prolia®

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*List price is also referred to as wholesale acquisition cost or WAC. WAC is the price at which Amgen sells its products to wholesalers. Prolia is an injection administered by a healthcare professional once every six months.
Source: AnalySource. Accessed on March 22, 2019. Patients may need to pay a higher price due to additional doctor administration or pharmacy charges.
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Important Safety Information

Do not take Prolia® if you: have low blood calcium; or are pregnant or plan to become pregnant, as Prolia® may harm your unborn baby; or are allergic to denosumab or any ingredients in Prolia®.
What is the most important information I should know about Prolia®?
If you receive Prolia®, you should not receive XGEVA®. Prolia® contains the same medicine as XGEVA® (denosumab).
Prolia® can cause serious side effects:
Serious allergic reactions have happened in people who take Prolia®. Call your doctor or go to your nearest emergency room right away if you have any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including low blood pressure (hypotension); trouble breathing; throat tightness; swelling of your face, lips, or tongue; rash; itching; or hives.
Low blood calcium (hypocalcemia). Prolia® may lower the calcium levels in your blood. If you have low blood calcium, it may get worse during treatment. Your low blood calcium must be treated before you receive Prolia®.
Take calcium and vitamin D as your doctor tells you to help prevent low blood calcium.
Severe jaw bone problems (osteonecrosis) may occur. Your doctor should examine your mouth before you start Prolia® and may tell you to see your dentist. It is important for you to practice good mouth care during treatment with Prolia®.
Unusual thigh bone fractures. Some people have developed unusual fractures in their thigh bone. Symptoms of a fracture include new or unusual pain in your hip, groin, or thigh.
Increased risk of broken bones, including broken bones in the spine, after stopping Prolia®. After your treatment with Prolia® is stopped, your risk for breaking bones, including bones in your spine, is increased. Your risk for having more than 1 broken bone in your spine is increased if you have already had a broken bone in your spine. Do not stop taking Prolia® without first talking with your doctor. If your Prolia® treatment is stopped, talk to your doctor about other medicine that you can take.
Serious infections in your skin, lower stomach area (abdomen), bladder, or ear may happen. Inflammation of the inner lining of the heart (endocarditis) due to an infection may also happen more often in people who take Prolia®. You may need to go to the hospital for treatment.
Prolia® is a medicine that may affect the ability of your body to fight infections. People who have weakened immune systems or take medicines that affect the immune system may have an increased risk for developing serious infections.
Skin problems such as inflammation of your skin (dermatitis), rash, and eczema have been reported.
Bone, joint, or muscle pain. Some people who take Prolia® develop severe bone, joint, or muscle pain.
Before taking Prolia®, tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions, including if you:
  • Take the medicine XGEVA® (denosumab)
  • Have low blood calcium
  • Cannot take daily calcium and vitamin D
  • Had parathyroid or thyroid surgery (glands located in your neck)
  • Have been told you have trouble absorbing minerals in your stomach or intestines (malabsorption syndrome)
  • Have kidney problems or are on kidney dialysis
  • Are taking medicine that can lower your blood calcium levels
  • Plan to have dental surgery or teeth removed
  • Are pregnant or plan to become pregnant
    Females who are able to become pregnant:
    • Your healthcare provider should do a pregnancy test before you start treatment with Prolia®.
    • You should use an effective method of birth control (contraception) during treatment with Prolia® and for at least 5 months after your last dose of Prolia®.
    • Tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant while taking Prolia®.
  • Are breast-feeding or plan to breast-feed

What are the possible side effects of Prolia®?

It is not known if the use of Prolia® over a long period of time may cause slow healing of broken bones. The most common side effects of Prolia® in women being treated for osteoporosis after menopause are back pain, pain in your arms and legs, high cholesterol, muscle pain, and bladder infection.

The most common side effects of Prolia® in men with osteoporosis are back pain, joint pain, and common cold (runny nose or sore throat).

The most common side effects of Prolia® in patients with corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis are back pain, high blood pressure, lung infection (bronchitis), and headache.

The most common side effects of Prolia® in patients receiving certain treatments for prostate or breast cancer are joint pain, back pain, pain in your arms and legs, and muscle pain. Additionally, in Prolia®-treated men with nonmetastatic prostate cancer receiving ADT, a greater incidence of cataracts was observed.

These are not all the possible side effects of Prolia®. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088. 

Indications

Prolia® is a prescription medicine used to treat osteoporosis in women after menopause who are at high risk for fracture or cannot use another osteoporosis medicine or other osteoporosis medicines did not work well.

Prolia® is a prescription medicine used to increase bone mass in men with osteoporosis who are at high risk for fracture.

Prolia® is a prescription medicine used to treat osteoporosis in men and women who will be taking corticosteroid medicines (such as prednisone) for at least six months and are at high risk for fracture.

Prolia® is a prescription medicine used to treat bone loss in men who are at high risk for fracture receiving certain treatments for prostate cancer that has not spread to other parts of the body.

Prolia® is a prescription medicine used to treat bone loss in women who are at high risk for fracture receiving certain treatments for breast cancer that has not spread to other parts of the body.

Please see Prolia® full Prescribing Information and Medication Guide.

Important Safety Information

Do not take Prolia® if you: have low blood calcium; or are pregnant or plan to become pregnant, as Prolia® may harm your unborn baby; or are allergic to denosumab or any ingredients in Prolia®.
What is the most important information I should know about Prolia®?
If you receive Prolia®, you should not receive XGEVA®. Prolia® contains the same medicine as XGEVA® (denosumab). 
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